For an animation to be able to fit into an app, it has to be able to stand on its own. One way would be if the game engine makes use of an animation on a certain part of the screen and makes use of this in an animation-overlay, but this is unlikely to happen and requires a game which will not have any visual updates on screen in between the playing sequence itself.

In other words, an animation is not a true independent character which has a name and it’s animation. An animation is a string of bytes which the animator sets before recording it. The engine (or the application) will then copy the entire animation sequence into the graphics memory of the game, which looks completely different from the final sprite when that happens.


What is animation and how is it used on a daily basis? Is there a universal answer? What makes an animated story, or scene? To answer these questions and many others, it will help to understand the basic principles and rules of animation. For this course I hope to provide a strong foundation for our future animators as we develop this process.


In this course, you will learn the general principles of animation in 2 main areas: the process of drawing and composition. In this course you will practice drawing a variety of animated images and learn how to understand the process for constructing and editing them.

Along the way, you’ll learn fundamental drawing techniques like outline and perspective, how to create and edit animated effects, and how to work with audio, which is one of the important skills you’ll need in order to produce a great, visually stunning experience. All of us at The Animation Store are artists.

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